Next shoot for American Car mag this weekend…

Always like to have a rece for a shoot before hand to get a feel of the place.  Try and get a few angles sorted and plan as much as possible what order of shots are needed.

Went a few weeks ago to have a look at this place. …

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For the record the car in the spotlight is a 1971 Camaro…

Finding a location that fits the car for me is just as important as the angle of shot etc….

Urban, rough, gritty feel is what I’m hoping for.  The last shoot for thismag made Febs cover (which I’ll post here shortly) but the location again played a major role in the feel of that shoot.

Another image for you from the rece for this weekend’s shoot…

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I’ll try and post a few images this weekend…

Till then have a good n.

Have you ever driven blindfolded?

I’m sure the most of us have not driven blind folded but for a recent shoot, I was asked to document a world record for a blind driver.

Miles-Hilton Barber lost his sight in his 20’s but for this Zimbabwean it has not held him back. He is a motivational speaker and international adventurer with a list of achievements and records that a sighted person could only dream of.

This record was to set the fastest speed whilst driving a Morgan three wheeler. Aided by his sighted co-pilot Colin Terry of ‘3 Wheel Drive’ Miles reached a speed of over 100mph. If it wasn’t for the strong cross wind I’m sure he would have pushed the car further.

To see more of Miles’ adventures please visit his website here.

(a potted history of Miles… Words from the Mog Mag article…)

Miles began losing his sight in his early-20s due to retinitis pigmentosa, and by 30 he was totally blind. He moved to England and worked for the Royal National Institute for the Blind and started participating in sporting adventures in the late-1990s. Achievements include: First blind pilot accompanied by a sighted copilot to undertake a 55-day, 21,000 kilometre microlight flight from London to Sydney, relying on revolutionary speech-output technology on his instruments for navigation; crossing the entire Qatar Desert non-stop day/night in 78 hours without sleep; and circumnavigating 38,000 miles around the world using 80 forms of transport.